Experiences and stories

A collection of videos that document and share some of the highlights of our own learning journey with others.

This podcast is a discussion between Ron Gant and Nippin Anand about learning within the context of accident investigations. Ron and Nippin discuss the underlying beliefs, myths and the narratives of accident investigations and what it takes to learn from accidents. The podcast is based on Nippin’s recent book, ‘Are we learning from accidents?’

 

Further details about the book can be found here:

https://novellus.solutions/product/are-we-learning-from-accidents-nippin-anand/

In this podcast, Greg and Nippin discuss how can we learn from accidents. Greg asks Nippin a range of questions including who needs to learn, why we need to learn, and whether or not learning is even an issue of importance within organisations. You will discover some uncomfortable truths and deep-seated beliefs about how investigations are conducted and why we are so far away from learning from accidents.

In this podcast, Nippin speaks with Ivan Pupulidy and Crista Vesel about their latest book, ‘Human and Organisational Potential.’ The two authors discuss the motivation to write the book and the practical benefits that this book to the risk and safety world and how it will make our world a better place. Link to the book: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Human-Organization-Potential-Ivan-Pupulidy/dp/B0CQ477B5F/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?crid=28X6N5ZTLPSI1&dib=eyJ2IjoiMSJ9.3ua2ZUpC5HER7YpS6A1Y5gv6dwF1lfxjI50SWN9KHKQ4ZP5UnMz5-WNwU2MHiBjN.Gn63gIh8L78EMaqukBdKpziseYctWQySILIOqxqvSmw&dib_tag=se&keywords=ivan+pupulidy&qid=1714634208&sprefix=%2Caps%2C95&sr=8-1-fkmr0

What is a myth? Can science ever replace myth? And if it did, what would we replace it with? Here’s a podcast shot in an Indian temple with my two friends Rob Long and Matthew Thorne discussing myth, mythology and mythosphere.

I hope this podcast will give you an alternative view on myth and why human beings can never do away with myth even in this day and age or in the future.

We often hear during risk and safety discussions that methodology does not matter, methods don’t matter, philosophy doesn’t matter, what matters is results, what matters is that whatever we set to achieve – we can achieve. And so, results matter, process is not important. Is that so?

What is a methodology? Why do we need one? Can we escape methodology and method? What are we really saying when we say that methodology does not matter? Can we ever abandon methodology? What is the hidden message here? What are the dangers of falling in the trap of a ‘methodology free’ world?

I hope this podcast will make you think and reflect on a simple question – what is your methodology when it comes to tackling risk?  And should that matter?

The podcast was done on a motorway whilst driving in Chennai, India.

This is the second in a series of 2 episodes on psychosocial harm. The question we ask in this two-part series – how safety practices can do more harm than good? In the first episode, our focus was more on understanding the problem of psychosocial harm from a legal and organisational perspective. In this episode, we focus on some practical ways to address these issues. I hope you will enjoy listening as much as we enjoyed creating this episode and it will make you think and reflect.

This is the first of a series of 2 podcasts where Greg Smith, Rob Long and I discuss the psychosocial harm that results from safety practices (for instance investigations, audits, inspections). Sometimes, and often unknowingly, safety practices can do more harm than good when we try to address psychosocial risks in our organisations. This discussion takes a broader view of the psychosocial risks from a legal, organisational and compliance perspective. We hope that this discussion will trigger some questions and introspections in you and within your groups. 

Do you think safety is about saving lives? In this podcast, Rob, Nippin and Pedro question the myth of ‘Safety saves lives’. What do we mean when we say we are in the business of ‘saving lives.’ Saving from whom, saved by whom and for whom? Where does this myth originate from? Whose purpose does it serve? What are the (unintended) implications of using this language when we are unaware of the underlying beliefs and myths? And finally, what could be the alternative ways to think about safety that can lead us to a pathway of humanising risk and relating with people?

We hope that this discussion will make you think and question your assumptions about safety and shift your focus towards meaningfully tackling risks in an uncertain world.  

 

How often people get abused and victimised during safety inspections and audits?

I’ve heard so many stories of abuse and violence in the name of safety audits and inspections. In the maritime industry people are committing suicide and feeling anxious and depressed because of the very thought of an inspection or an audit. There are well-intentioned auditors and inspectors who would never intend to abuse anyone or misuse their power to achieve better results. Unfortunately, though, when we get so fixated on numbers, targets and dashboards, people become objects in the service of such tangible goals. How helpful are standards and concepts (psychosocial, human element, human factors, human performance etc.) without a serious discussion on ethics and power? Devoid of this discussion, numbers and targets become a mechanism to dehumanise the powerless. Here’s a discussion on ethics and power and how the issue of ethics is kept silent in the culture of risk and safety. We hope the discussion will make you think, reflect and question the current state of affairs in risk and safety.

In this video podcast, Nippin and Rosa discuss how to conduct a risk assessment using the iCue method. Rosa asks some great questions about the method and how to create a space for generative learning. Towards the end, Nippin even demonstrates how the iCue method is different from traditional risk assessments using forms and checklists.

A conversation with Nippin Anand and Rob Long

It’s the start of a new year and I thought it would be wonderful to start off on a positive note. The topic of this year’s first podcast is imagination.

What is imagination? Why do we need people to be more imaginative, more creative in the risk and safety industry? And do we really need people to be imaginative in a compliance driven industry with strict rules to follow? What about the (unintended) consequences of thinking ‘outside the box’ in a high risk environment?

These are some of the questions Dr Rob Long and I tackle in this conversation.

A conversation with Nippin Anand and Rosa Carrillo

It is often said that safety people require a predisposition of care and empathy towards others. Rosa Carrillo’s well-researched book ‘OHS Voices from The Resistance’ brings a paradox to surface. What if care and empathy make (safety) people vulnerable and fragile in the face of growing aggression and brutalism in the workplaces? The book is packed with stories of people working in the safety function struggle to maintain their identity and become seen as misfits in their organisations. While some find themselves out grouped from within their own organisations, others consider abandoning the safety industry as a whole. Rosa’s conversation with Nippin is deeply personal and reflective of her own struggles and ethnicity. For those interested, Rosa’s offers her wisdom on how to tackle and live with some of these issues: https://carrilloconsultants.com/product/voices-from-the-resistance/

Nippin Anand and Pedro Ferreira follow up on their conversation in Croatia

This is a conversation about what it takes to bring cultural sensitivity into organisations. Nippin and Pedro discuss several examples of how fostering conversations that are not power dominated and where personal agendas are not so much at play, can bring about a much better understanding of different perspectives. The understanding and sharing of different perspectives then brings about a much enhanced decision-making.

A conversation with Nippin Anand and Pedro Ferreira

How do you understand culture, cultural sensitivity and risk intelligence? How can being culturally sensitive make us risk intelligent? Nippin Anand and Pedro Ferreira offer some thoughts. And guess where they are – in the cultural capital of Europe i.e. Rijeka, Croatia

A conversation with Nippin Anand and Steve Shorrock

This podcast is dedicated to people who put on a performance (a show) every day when they come to work. performance means many things, although in the risk and safety world we have become excessively focused on work and the narrative goes something like this that in order for the worker to perform well, she needs the right support from the company. Support in the form of the right processes, right tools, right instructions, right directions and the right rules. And once you do that, not only safety but reliability, quality and efficiency will also improve. Since it is all about performance, the focus still remains on measurements and dashboards, AI and technique. But there is another kind of performance, the kind of performance that we notice with people who are going through so much in their lives (family issues, marital problems, trauma, identity crisis, discrimination, victimisation, bullying, harassment, sexual abuse and so on) and yet they are expected to put on a show when they turn to work. that’s performance, just like Freddie Mercury making sure the show must go on. Do we care to understand performance from this perspective? Is it even important given that this has ‘nothing’ to do with work? Steve Shorrock and I had a heartfelt conversation on this topic and we share our thoughts in this podcast. We hope this podcast will make you think, reflect and approach your colleagues and friends with a different perspective about performance.

A conversation with Nippin Anand and Rob Long

Our society has become so obsessed with measurement that even leisure, reading, wellbeing and healthy living have become a topic for efficiency. Many of us live and die without experiencing a life outside of efficiency and measurement. Take for instance the case of the father of scientific management Frederick Taylor. Even on his deathbed, Taylor was seen winding a stopwatch. What a paradox that we won’t let go of measurement even when there is no time left to live? But things are not that straightforward. How do we explain the countless time sitting on the couch browsing through social media without purpose or meaning? How do we explain investments in weapons of mass destruction? Clearly these are issues that cannot always be understood through the lenses of efficiency. In this podcast, Rob Long and I discuss the meaning of Technique as an ideology (or a worldview) that has come to dominate our lives. The ideology of Technique comes from the work of the French philosopher Jacques Ellul but was also discussed in the work of Heidegger and other philosophers. We hope this podcast will make you think, reflect and live a more fulfilling life.

A conversation with Nippin Anand and Greg Smith

Greg Smith and I recently did a podcast where I asked Greg about how far the industry has onboarded his wisdom about paper safety. The discussion ended in a very interesting place where we both felt the need to articulate a very basic question – what is safety?

It sounds like a simple question but there are so many dimensions to the idea of safety that we never come to a shared understanding and so I’m afraid we don’t have an answer but we do have some questions for you to reflect upon.

I hope you will enjoy listening and watching this podcast as much as Greg and I enjoyed creating it for you.

A conversation with Nippin Anand and Rob Long

The world is a semiosphere meaning the visual world around us have a symbolic and mythical meaning. In Social Psychology of Risk (SPoR), we often say that when it comes to making meaning of the outside world, ‘everything is significant’ or ‘nothing never happens.’ To a semiotically sensitive person i.e., to someone who becomes aware of the limits of their senses, there is so much wisdom in coming to terms with our ignorance. Being semiotically aware makes us culturally sensitive and risk intelligent.

I hope you will enjoy listening and watching this podcast as much as Dr Rob Long and I enjoyed creating it for you.

Measurement has come to dominate every aspect of human life. In the risk and safety world, we have been exclusively and excessively wedded to methods that can demonstrate tangible ways (i.e. through documented procedures and KPIs) of proving risk and safety. But the limitations of these methods are increasingly gaining traction in our industry and some of us are even asking bold questions such as what exactly are we doing in the name of risk and safety?

Greg Smith in his book “Paper Safe” has brilliantly unpacked this issue and the assumptions behind this thinking in a pragmatic sense. Greg and I met in his hometown, in fact at his home in Perth, Australia for a heartfelt conversation on this topic. My question in this podcast to Greg is this – ‘to what extent the industry has embraced his wisdom about the illusion of paper safety?’

I have often been asked the question ‘what is SPoR?’ During a recent travel to Canberra Rob Long and I sat down to discuss SPoR and what it means. We took this video after four days of intensive discussions shortly before I left Canberra.

I hope this video will provide a starting point for the philosophy, ethic and predisposition of Social Psychology of Risk and what is unique (not better or superior) about the SPoR worldview.

My biggest takeaway from this conversation with Rob was that central to all learning and listening is being honest about our our ethics and how we relate with people and the world around us. Tools, templates and methods are secondary when it comes to listening, understanding human decision making and learning from the others.

Another car cast where Dr Rob Long, Dr Nippin Anand and Dr Pedro Ferreira explore briefly the evolutionary perspective about culture. Much of what we hear about culture and more specifically safety culture, is grounded in social science. Here is a different view on (safety)culture. Not better or worse, simply some alternative views and complimentary thoughts

Continuing their car casts on the roads in Chennai (India), Dr Rob Long, Dr Pedro Ferreira and Dr Nippin Anand ask a basic question – what does it means to be an educated person? What is a human person? What is personhood and why personhood matters when it comes to understanding culture?

Dr Rob Long, Dr Nippin Anand and Dr Pedro Ferreira are on a car journey on the roads in Chennai, India exploring the topic of learning. So not the usual podcast but a carcast! The discussion begins with a brief introduction to what learning is not. Drawing up examples of driving and the road journey in India we then discuss how human beings learn. We discuss what is embodiment and why embodied learning matters for learning to become effective and sustainable in an organisation.

Dr Nippin Anand and Dr Rob Long explore the meaning of ‘safety culture’. We explore the symbolism, rituals and myths of safety and question the ‘silences’ (i.e., what is not spoken) in the discourse of safety. We discuss religion and taboos and why focusing on taboos is essential to understanding safety culture.

The risk and safety industry typically approaches human being as a rational being and decision making as a rational, calculative, brain-centric exercise. In this podcast, Dr Rob Long and Dr Nippin Anand discuss the need for transdisciplinary thinking to understand how we as human beings make decisions with the view to improve decision making.

 

In this podcast, Dr Rob Long and Dr Pedro Ferreira discuss the idea of ‘stop the job’. ‘Stop the job’ is a tool to empower people to stop an operation when they feel it is not safe to continue any longer. How does the idea of empowering someone to trust their intuition work in practice?

 

Have you ever wondered what is faith in true sense? Why do we hesitate so much to use the word faith? In this podcast Dr Rob Long and Dr Pedro Ferreira explore what is faith and why faith is essential to learning and living.

 

A podcast on understanding culture, safety culture and how we as human beings learn. Dr Rob Long and I explore why doubt is essential to learning? Have you ever paid close attention to how we speak? What is the language of risk and safety? In this podcast, we discuss why the language of doubt and uncertainty is essential to learning.

 

How can we ask open ended questions? How do we make people think and reflect about their assumptions and biases? How can we apply this framework to our current practices in risk management without having to redesign the entire system? In the video below, we will focus on applying the iCue method to risk assessments and tool box discussions to generate engagement and learning. For more information please reach out to us at support@novellus.solutions.

This is a short video to demonstrate how the iCue method works in practice using the practical example of a risk assessment. iCue method is based on Social Psychology of Risk. For more information please reach out to us at support@novellus.solutions.

This is a short video to demonstrate how the iCue method works in practice using the practical example of an incident investigation. iCue method is based on Social Psychology of Risk. For more information please reach out to us at support@novellus.solutions 

Here is an iCue exercise the Novellus team did and enjoyed. 

Nippin Anand , Pedro Ferreira, Lincy Mathew

Pitching, Framing, Priming, Mirroring and Anchoring

Here is a conversation with Rob Long where we briefly discuss pitching, framing, priming, mirroring and anchoring. The knowledge of these tools is vital to enriching the quality of our conversations and building trust with others.


Mandala Symbolism: relevance to risk management

In this video Rob Long, Nippin Anand and Pedro Ferreira discuss the Mandala Symbolism based on the work of pioneering thinkers including Carl Gustav Jung. Mandala is one of the earliest symbols of human civilisation and can be found in one form or the other in almost every culture. At a time when humankind is experiencing upheaval and imbalance in every aspect of life, the Mandala symbol helps us to maintain peace and harmony with nature. Listen to the wisdom of Dr Rob Long who discusses how the Mandala symbolism and thinking can be practically applied to the world of risk management.

Transdisciplinary thinking: an introductory discussion with Craig Ashhurst

In this podcast, Craig and I draw from our personal lives and discuss why a transdisciplinary approach is essential to understanding and tackling risk. Amongst other things, we discuss the idea of collective coherence, the myth of normal and yes – the power of dreams that is so overlooked in our contemporary lives. Without dreams, there is no imagination and creativity.

Resiliencing, sustainability, cognitive dissonance and learning

This podcast is a discussion about inner resilience, positive psychology, cognitive dissonance and learning. For anyone interested to understand the deeper and person-centred meaning of resilience you may find the concepts discussed in this podcast helpful.

Speakers: Nippin Anand, Rob Long



Learning, change and paradigm shift - Reflections on the iCue method

What is learning and what is the relationship between listening and learning? In a podcast with Nick Little, the headteacher of the International School of Aberdeen, we discuss learning and ‘paradigm change using the iCue framework. The iCue method is a framework for extracting intelligent cues(iCue) in a conversation with the view to listen, understand and improve the quality of decisions. After attending one of the iCue sessions, Nick offers his insights about the iCue method and how he believes that this approach can bring about a paradigm shift for learning and change.

 

Part 5 - Is Just Culture desirable for learning?

This is the fifth of six sessions on learning explore the relationship between just culture and learning with a panel of internationally renowned experts in safety and human factors. The purpose of this session is to explore the different perspective on just culture and learning and to understand those differences from a legal, operational, and research perspective.

Panellists: Nippin Anand, Kym Bancroft, Daniel Hummerdal, Jay Banerjee, Clive Lloyd

Part 4 - Is Just Culture desirable for learning?

This is the fourth of six sessions on learning explore the relationship between just culture and learning with a panel of internationally renowned experts in safety and human factors. The purpose of this session is to explore the different perspective on just culture and learning and to understand those differences from a legal, operational, and research perspective.

Panellists: Nippin Anand, Steven Shorrock, Rosa Carrillo, Carsten Busch, Tanya Hewitt

Part 3 - Is Just Culture desirable for learning?

This is the third of six sessions on learning explore the relationship between just culture and learning with a panel of internationally renowned experts in safety and human factors. The purpose of this session is to explore the different perspective on just culture and learning and to understand those differences from a legal, operational, and research perspective. Panellists: Donna Cohen, Robert J de Boer, Nikolaos Chalaris and Nippin Anand

Part 2 - Is Just Culture desirable for learning?

This is the second of six sessions on learning explore the relationship between just culture and learning with a panel of internationally renowned experts in safety and human factors. The purpose of this session is to explore the different perspective on just culture and learning and to understand those differences from a legal, operational, and research perspective.

Panellists: Neil Richardson, Diane-Chadwick Jones, Oessur Hilduberg, Nektarios Karanikas

Part 1 - Is Just Culture desirable for learning?

This is the first of six sessions on learning explore the relationship between just culture and learning with a panel of internationally renowned experts in safety and human factors. The purpose of this session is to explore the different perspective on just culture and learning and to understand those differences from a legal, operational, and research perspective.

Panellists: Neil Richardson, Diane-Chadwick Jones, Oessur Hilduberg, Nektarios Karanikas, Robert J de Boer, Greg Smith, Steven Shorrock

The war on expertise: how to prepare and how to win

Expertise has become increasingly advanced and increasingly essential in settings requiring skilled decision-making, particularly under time pressure and uncertainty. And yet expertise has come under greater and greater assault from a variety of communities. This session will review these attacks, explain their flaws, and describe tactics for countering the critics and for promoting expertise in organizational settings.

Rituals for moving on from disaster

It is often said that if you know your subject well you should have no difficulty in making clear and concise arguments. The proof is in the pudding. My guest, Johan Bergström, in this week’s podcast is blessed with immense wisdom and the unique ability to communicate his thoughts on one of the most difficult topics in safety sciences with such clarity and depth (in about twenty minutes).